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Bible

A King James Vocabulary Lesson

In 2011, the Christian world celebrated the four-hundredth anniversary of the publication of the King James translation of the English Bible. The King James Version (KJV) has survived well and continues to stand as one of the more literal English translations. But as with all translations, any modern rendition of biblical language is accurate and fully dependable only “as far as it is translated correctly” (A of F 1:8).

Categories
Ancient history Old Testament

Did the Jerusalem Temple Really Have Treasures?

The Jerusalem Temple treasures are rumored to have been hidden or stolen in association with conflicts like the First Jewish Revolt—if they existed at all. Interestingly, archaeological evidence such as the Arch of Titus suggests that Romans absconded with riches like a menorah. A Hebrew text called Massekhet Kelim also leaves tantalizing clues—and is (mis)used as a treasure map by modern enthusiasts. In this interview, biblical scholar Elena Dugan explains more.

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Bible Theology

How Do Latter-day Saints Approach Biblical Theology?

Biblical theology is both ancient and new as an academic field. In recent years, there has been a blossoming of theological work among the members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including the Old Testament, New Testament, and Restoration scripture. This interview with Joseph M. Spencer discusses the relationship between church members and biblical theology.

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Come Follow Me Cornerstone New Testament

Come Follow Me 2023: New Testament Resources

The Come, Follow Me 2023 lessons are drawn from the New Testament. The Sunday School curriculum complements the Book of Mormon as a witness of Jesus Christ, and the title is taken from the Savior’s invitation in Matthew and Luke: “Come, follow me.” This article contains scriptural insights from Latter-day Saints and notable secular scholars, along with the Come, Follow Me 2023 schedule.

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Bible

Why Do Latter-day Saints Use the King James Version?

The King James Version (KJV) of the Bible has been used by English-speaking Latter-day Saints since the time of Joseph Smith. However, our commitment to the 400-year-old translation places us in a minority within the United States—and even differs from how the Church translates the Bible in other languages. In this interview, New Testament scholar Thomas Wayment explains why U.S. Latter-day Saints use the King James Version and what might be involved in publishing a new translation.

Categories
New Testament

Who Were the Women in the Lineage of Jesus?

The genealogy of Jesus in the New Testament includes several women with a hint of sexual scandal. When combined with the wicked men in the Savior’s ancestry, it teaches several subtle lessons—including how Matthew may have prepared his audience for the virgin birth. In this interview, Camille Fronk Olson explains what we can learn from the women in the lineage of Jesus.

Categories
Bible Theology

Margaret Barker: Why Do Latter-day Saints Like Her So Much?

Margaret Barker is a world-renowned biblical scholar. She’s been quoted by the likes of N. T. Wright and given an award by the Queen of England. Interestingly, the Methodist preacher is also a favorite of many Latter-day Saint scholars. In this interview, Kevin Christensen tells the story of how Barker first encountered the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints—and why so many of the faith’s scholars are drawn to her work.

Categories
Bible

What Does It Mean to Be Anointed in the Bible?

Prophets, priests, and kings were anointed in the Old Testament. And the title Christ in the New Testament literally translates as “anointed one.” But what does that mean? This post draws from the comments of Tim Mackie and John Collins in a seven-part series by the Bible Project explaining that anointing is a ritual in which people and places are set apart as portals between heaven and earth. The story starts in the Garden of Eden and ends with contemporary Christian disciples.

Categories
Ancient history New Testament

Was Jesus a Rabbi?

The Gospels repeatedly designate Jesus as a rabbi. For some, the term adds an extra layer of depth to the historical Jesus. But it’s not that simple for everyone. For example, calling Jesus a rabbi associates him with Judaism. It also reinforces his role as a historical figure. Both implications go against the grain of certain ideologies. In this interview, Mary Magdalene author Bruce Chilton explains more—and reflects on reactions to his book, Rabbi Jesus: An Intimate Biography.

Categories
Ancient history New Testament

What Was the First Jewish Revolt?

The siege of Jerusalem of 70 CE was the decisive event of the First Jewish–Roman War. Culminating in the destruction of the city and of the temple, the revolt and subsequent war were a tragedy that impacted the future of Judaism and Christianity as well as the New Testament. This interview with Jared W. Ludlow discusses the First Jewish Revolt.

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